Dr. Gertrise Thomas, ND.

Dr. Gertrise Thomas, ND.

Whole You with Dr. Ge

I help people of color create wellness plans to shift the mind and body’s stress responses. The goal is to go from triggers to growth and overall health.

The seasons are changing and for some the glitz and glam of the holiday season comes with decreased moods and a decline in energy. Some have taken to calling this change the “Winter Blues”, a reference to the time of energy that most experience this. Watching the festiveness of the season rise, while you are experiencing a decline can be frustrating and make you feel even worse than you already did.

However, there are some things that you can do that may help.

First, let me just encourage you by saying that you are not alone in this journey and the “winter blues” is more common than you may think. The correct term for this occurrence is actually Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and is estimated to affect more than 10 million Ameicans, not including those that may be experiencing mild symptoms. This means that about 1 in every 33 people in the US are affected by this condition. Some of you may be wondering how will you know if you’re dealing with SAD.Here are some of the things that you may want to look out for:

  • Oversleeping
  • Appetite changes (over eating, craving carbs)
  • Weight gain
  • Drop in energy levels
  • Fatigue
  • Social withdrawal

These are just a few of the symptoms that can occur with SAD and it may mimic depression. However, one key sign is that it occurs around the same time, yearly. If you’re already dealing with depression, SAD may make your symptoms worse.

Naturopathic medicine, naturopathic doctor

So, what can be done to help with it?

One of the top recommendations is broad-band light therapy, which means exposure to a light box for 30 – 60 minutes a day. This therapy is thought to make up for diminished natural sunlight exposure.

Increased Omega-3 fatty acids via diet and supplementation. High dose Omega-3 fatty acids can help to improve mood and mental function.

Vitamin D deficiency can also exacerbate, if not cause, SAD symptoms. So supplementing with Vitamin D may also have a positive effect on SAD.

Other options that may help include psychotherapy and antidepressants.

Above all else, if you are feeling hopeless and in need of help, don’t hesitate to reach out to your primary care or another healthcare professional to get assistance.

If you begin to have suicidal thoughts please reach out to the suicide hotline at 800-273-8255 or your local behavioral health crisis center.

Dr. Gertrise Thomas, ND.

Dr. Gertrise Thomas, ND.

Whole You with Dr. Ge

I help people of color create wellness plans to shift the mind and body’s stress responses. The goal is to go from triggers to growth and overall health.

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